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NEW YORK

Group honors War of 1812 veteran with new marker in East Pembroke

PUBLISHED: MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2017 AT 5:15 AM

 

OBSERVER Photo by Gib Snyder The Dunkirk Lighthouse & Veterans Park Museum will be the site of a plaque dedication on Saturday at 2 p.m. honoring War of 1812 heroine Celea Sampson “Widow” Cole.

 

OBSERVER Photo by Gib Snyder The Dunkirk Lighthouse & Veterans Park Museum will be the site of a plaque dedication on Saturday at 2 p.m. honoring War of 1812 heroine Celea Sampson “Widow” Cole.

The State of New York Society, United States Daughters of 1812, will dedicate a new plaque in recognition of War of 1812 heroine, Celea Sampson “Widow” Cole on Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Dunkirk Lighthouse & Veterans Park Museum, 1 Lighthouse Point Drive N., Dunkirk.

Celea (Sampson) Cole was the wife of Seth Cole, first settler in the Dunkirk area and a Revolutionary War Soldier who had settled at the mouth of Canadaway Creek. Celea was widowed upon his death in 1810.

Widow Cole was known for the great courage she displayed during the War of 1812; serving as patrol, spreading the alarm among settlers, feeding the soldiers stationed near her home, as well as melting her pewter dishes and precious teapot to make bullets for their use.

The plaque which will be placed by the State of NY Society, U.S. Daughters of 1812 reads:

On Sept. 26, 1812 and from this site, some of the first shots of the War of 1812 were fired by local militia at armed soldiers from the British schooner Lady Prevost. When a small boat carrying the soldiers from the British ship was sighted rowing in pursuit of an American salt barge that had taken refuge at the mouth of Canadaway Creek, local citizen Celea Sampson “Widow” Cole rode her horse to the settlement of Canadaway (Fredonia) to secure reinforcements. Recognized as a War of 1812 heroine for her efforts to spread the alarm, the widow Cole reportedly also carried food and water to the militiamen and melted her pewter dishes to make bullets for their use during the attack. (Inscription details were researched by Mary Raye Casper, state historian and 4th vice president national).

In recognition of the significant impact made by widow Cole in both the Dunkirk and Fredonia areas in 1812, NY Daughters are inviting the public to join them on the grounds of the Lighthouse for this plaque dedication.

The State of NY Society would like to thank David Briska, Dunkirk Lighthouse; Loretta Hill, Newman Brothers; and Linda Blodgett, Titus Monuments; for their assistance with creation of and placement of the plaque.

The purposes of the National Society, United States Daughters of 1812 are to promote patriotism; to preserve and increase the knowledge of history of the American people, by the preservation of documents and relics, the marking of historic spots, the recording of family histories and traditions, the celebration of patriotic anniversaries, teaching and emphasizing the heroic deeds of the civil, military and naval life of those who molded the government between the close of the American Revolution and the close of the War of 1812, to urge Congress to compile and publish authentic records of men in civil, military and naval service from 1784-1815, inclusive.

Questions about the Dunkirk dedication and/or membership in the 1812 organization may be directed to Beverly Sterling-Affinati at harborsideservices@gmail.com. Mary Raye Casper resides in Marcellus, New York, and has been instrumental in moving the State of NY Society forward through each of its last three administrations.

For Resources Pertaining to War of 1812 Soldiers in NY State Click Heree
This website, the result of a project undertaken by NY Daughters, includes
the following:

 

 

PUBLIC RElATIONS REPORT 2016 Click Here

ARTICLES SUBMITTED BY NY BASED ON RESEARCH Click Here

Biography of Hiram Cronk, last surviving War of 1812 soldier Open Link Here

NY MISCELLANEOS PR NOTES (RESEARCH AND HISTORY ARTICLES= CLICK HERE

Research, Document, Preserve NYCompendium 2015-2018 Compendium issued Fall, 2016 Click Here

 

Indesx Public Relations Photos 2015

To View Photos on Flicker Click Here

 

 

INDEX PR DOCUMENTS 2016

 

For Photos 2015 NY Click Here on Flicker

For Award Winning Publicity Brochure pt. 2 Click Here

For Award Winning Publicity Brochure Click Here

As part of New York's "Research, Document & Preserve" effort -

The following article was found reflecting 'This day in history' (October 7, 1912)...

COMMODORE OLIVER HAZZARD PERRY CHAPTER No. 4
MRS. FRANK D. CALLAN. Regent

The Commodore Oliver Hazzard Perry Chapter of Herkimer County, New York, has marked in Herkimer County the graves of one hundred and twelve soldiers of the War of 1812.

Special exercises were held in connection with marking the graves as follows : In the old historic church at the Town of Columbia on the 30th of June, 1910; at Frankfort, July 13, 1912; at Herkimer, October, 1912; in the old yellow church at Manheim, October 7, 1912 ; at the Town of Columbia, September 26, 1913; at Little Falls, October 22, 1913, and at Mohawk in 1914.

The Chapter has also contributed fifteen dollars to the fund for the Memorial Window in St. Michael's Church, Dartmoor, England.

Information taken from, "Mrs. William Gerry Slade, National President, 1897-1915; Report of the work of the National Society of United States Daughters of eighteen hundred and twelve”



 

 

 

NY SOCIETY PRESIDENT JAN JOHNPIER IS SHOWN HERE PRESENTING NATIONAL HISOTRY AWARD TO MR. ROBERT GANG, THE PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY OF THE SECOND WAR WITH GREAT BRITAIN IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK.

The General Jacob Brown Chapter Daughters of 1812 celebrated its second birthday on May 9, 1814.
(Published in Watertown Daily Times, 2014). Shown from L to R: Anne Davis, vice-president,
Tammy Plantz, historian, Boni Shafer, librarian, Beverly Sterling-Affianait, president and
Bette Lathan, corresponding secretary

Kate Emerson receivng Spirit Award from Niagara Frontier Chapter

 

Boni Shafer, representing the General Jacob Brown Chapter United States Daughter of 1812, Sackets Harbor, presented Jhónae Pearson-Martin with this year's JROTC medal in a special ceremony held at the Carthage Central School, on May 30, 2014 . The JROTC medal is given to recognize senior cadets for their outstanding leadership ability, military and scholastic achievement, loyalty, good character and patriotism.

 

REPORTS 2014-2015

Report New York Society "Picture Index" for 2014-2015 Year Click Here

Report New York Part one for 2014-2015 Click Here

Report New York Part two for 2014-2015 Click Here

Report of Niagara Frontier Chapter by Jan Johnpier Click Here

Report General Jacob Brown Chapter by Beverly Sterling Affinati Here

General Jacob Brown Newspaper Articles Here

REPORTS 2015-2016

Contributed: Wednesday, September 2, 2015 6:21 pm by Beverly Affinati

MARKING THE ANNIVERSARY OF STAR-SPANGLED BANNER

… “And the rockets’ red glare, the Bombs Bursting in air, gave proof through the night that our flag was still there...”

Sept. 14 marks the 201st anniversary of the writing of the Star Spangled Banner, our national anthem. It was penned by Francis Scott Key on Sept. 14, 1814, at Fort McHenry, after a night of heavy shelling by the British. The bombardment, known as the Battle of Baltimore, brought the fort under heavy fire.

"It seemed as though mother earth had opened and was vomiting shot and shell in a sheet of fire and brimstone," Key wrote later.

As the smoke cleared the next morning, Key saw the American flag still waving, and not the British Union Jack as he expected to see. Our country’s flag was flying over the fort, announcing that America had been victorious, and Key’s heart swelled. He began writing his thoughts on paper while still aboard ship, and ended up composing the lyrics of the Star Spangled Banner. It appeared in print all across the country, immortalizing his words, and forever naming the flag it celebrated.

… What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam, In full glory reflected now shines in the stream: ‘Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave! …

The Star Spangled Banner, written during the War of 1812, today is sung at ball games and other public events.

The effort to make it the official national anthem of the United States began with the United States Daughters of 1812, back in 1918 with Mrs. Reuben Ross Holloway, president of the Maryland State Society, who reached out to Maryland Rep. Charles Linthicum, whose bill finally passed in the House of Representatives on April 21, 1930, and in the Senate on March 3, 1931.  President Herbert Hoover signed the bill into law that same day.