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MARYLAND

Photos submitted by Anna Peterson, Historian Chasseur Chapter of Visit by President Virginia Apyar

Article from Maryland Independent dated June 16, 2014 Submitted by Connie Uy, President of the Ella Virginia Houck Holloway Chapter, Maryland. PRESIDENT CONNIE UY AND LADIES OF THE VIRGINIA HOLLOWAY CHAPTER MARK BICENTENNIAL OF THE BRITISH RAID ON BENEDICT, MARYLAND ON JUNE 15, 2014.
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After 200 years, a soldier from Southern Maryland is getting recognition.

Brig. Gen. Leonard Covington was born and raised in Aquasco. As a 24-year-old coronet of cavalry, Covington served with Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne’s army during his campaign against Native Americans on the western Ohio frontier.

When his cavalry commander was killed at the 1794 Battle of Fallen Timbers, Covington led a squadron into the center of the fighting, killing two Indian warriors, according to a news release from Ella Virginia Houck Holloway chapter, U.S. Daughters of 1812.

By 1795, Covington was a farmer back in Maryland and was soon voted into the state House of Delegates, then elected to U.S. Congress.

Upset by the Chesapeake Leopard affair, Covington once again joined the army as a lieutenant colonel of dragoons, heading a force that occupied Mobile, Ala.

By 1813, Covington was a brigadier general commanding a brigade of regular infantry in Canada. He died while leading the third brigade into the Battle of Crysler’s Farm in Ontario during the War of 1812.